Pitch it to Me Student Competition

Get feedback, network with industry and polish your pitch. 

Less pressure than Dragon's Den, our student pitch competition is based on the classic elevator pitch. An elevator pitch is designed to give a compelling  overview of a product, service, or idea taking no longer than the duration of an elevator ride.

The finalists for the competition have 2-3 minutes on video to pitch their idea to a panel of judges – for cash prizes. 

Pitch competition dinner

Teams selected to advance to the final took part in a complementary pitch competition dinner sponsored by Startup Edmonton. Students had the opportunity to meet entrepreneurs and industry and have their pitches voted on by guests. 

Winners of the pitch competition on November 26, 2019 were awarded prizes from the Colin Eicher fund.

2019 Pitch winners 

1st place – Deo Samuels for EZNotes (LiivLabs)
2nd place – Jonathan Mui for Agriolabs
3rd place – Raj Shah and Arth Soni for Edueats
Runners up – Hurb Inc. and Fly & Fetch


Entering the competition

Your team need to submit a 2-3 minute video.  The competition will be open to current NAIT students only.  Entries may be submitted by individuals or up to a group of 4.  

The top 5 teams selected by our judges will be invited to pitch in the finals. Participants at the dinner will cast their vote live to award the winning team. 

Suggested Pitch Structure

How should one go about delivering a great pitch? There are plenty of fantastic resources and videos online – read below for a general guide to elevator pitch structure. Creative and unique pitches are always welcome, but judges will be looking for the criteria below.

  1. Problem: outline the problem or pain point that your business will address.
  2. Solution: describe your solution to the problem.
  3. Idea and business model: describe in further detail how your solution works. Outline how your idea makes sense as a business – how will you make money? How will you fund the venture? Are you expecting to deliver investors with a return?
  4. Market validation: can you show that there is an appetite for your idea?
  5. Progress to date (if any): have you generated any revenue? Have you secured any funding? Do you have any goals or targets?
  6. The ask: a good pitch has an ask or a call to action. Do you need funding? Expertise? Space? Simply to meet for coffee to discuss? The judges will want to see an ask that makes sense for the business – and should feel compelled enough to want to explore your idea further.

Judging

Judges will be provided with a rubric for use in scoring pitches. Competitors will all have a chance to see the rubric during the opening ceremony. The top three competitors will be chosen according to the judges’ discretion, with the rubric being used as a guideline.

The rubric addresses several items, each associated with a score out of five.

  • Grabs your attention with a hook and has an interesting opener.
  • Clearly presents their product or service.
  • Explains the need or niche that their product or service will fill.
  • Explains the benefit and competitive advantage of the product or service.
  • Delivers the pitch with passion, heart, and enthusiasm. Is memorable.
  • Financial viability and investment potential.